Sadr But Wiser

June 27, 2008

In the past 3 months the US has quietly won the war in Iraq – not that you’d know that from our MSM.

Winning in Iraq means the same as winning in Germany and Japan in WW2 – replacing dictatorship with democratic government that holds a monopoly of force.

The Iraqi people elected a government that reflects their diverse interests, balancing Sunnis, Shiites, and Kurds. These goups successfully compromised, wheeling and dealing for their common good (there’s plenty for future political scientist to learn from this remarkable turnaround).

The unified Iraqi government then used its power forecefully and effectively:

The Mahdi Army suffered a significant blow during fighting against Iraqi and Coalition forces this year, according to an Iraq intelligence report. The heavy casualties suffered by the Mahdi Army have forced Muqtada al Sadr, the leader of the Mahdi Army and the Sadrist political movement, to change his tactics and disband the Mahdi Army in favor of a small, secretive fighting force.

“More than 2,000 cadres from the Mahdi Army leaders were killed recently,” an Iraqi intelligence official told Gulf News. “This led to the almost complete collapse of the army,” the official said. An estimated 1,300 Mahdi Army fighters “escaped to safe houses in Iran.” Muqtada al Sadr currently resides in Qom, Iran, under the protection of Iran’s Qods Force…

More than 1,000 Mahdi Army fighters were killed in Sadr City alone, according to a Mahdi Army commander in Baghdad. Another 415 were killed in Basrah.

The Basrah action was necessary because the British government handed that city over to Sadr:

Until September, when British troops pulled out of the city in what Gordon Brown described as a “pre-planned and organised” move, the fighting was as intense as any since the start of the war in 2003. This year, 44 British soldiers have died as a result of Britain’s operations in Iraq. Yet their commanders are now saying they got it wrong.

Rather than fight on, they have struck a deal – or accommodation, as they describe it – with the Shia militias that dominate the city, promising to stay out in return for assurances that they will not be attacked. Since withdrawing, the British have not set foot in the city and even have to ask for permission if they want to skirt the edges to get to the Iranian border on the other side.

Anyway, the US military took on the job of supporting the Iraqis, and now – although the fight goes on – the job is essentailly done.

Which is rather Sadr for the Mullahs and Brits, both of which emerge from this affair as weak horses.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.